American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland Politics and Society in Modern America Book 34

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Princeton University Press #ad - Robert self shows that racial inequities in both New Deal and Great Society liberalism precipitated local struggles over land, jobs, taxes, and race within postwar metropolitan development. American babylon demonstrates that the history of civil rights and black liberation politics in California did not follow a southern model, but represented a long-term struggle for economic rights that began during the World War II years and continued through the rise of the Black Panthers in the late 1960s.

This struggle yielded a wide-ranging and profound critique of postwar metropolitan development and its foundation of class and racial segregation. As the birthplace of the black panthers and a nationwide tax revolt, California embodied a crucial motif of the postwar United States: the rise of suburbs and the decline of cities, a process in which black and white histories inextricably joined.

American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland Politics and Society in Modern America Book 34 #ad - Self traces the roots of the 1978 tax revolt to the 1940s, real estate brokers, when home owners, and the federal government used racial segregation and industrial property taxes to forge a middle-class lifestyle centered on property ownership. American babylon tells this story through Oakland and its nearby suburbs, tracing both the history of civil rights and black power politics as well as the history of suburbanization and home-owner politics.

Using the east bay as a starting point, Robert Self gives us a richly detailed, engaging narrative that uniquely integrates the most important racial liberation struggles and class politics of postwar America. Black power and the tax revolt evolved together, in tension.

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Where I Was From Vintage International

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Vintage #ad - In this moving and unexpected book, Joan Didion reassesses parts of her life, her history, her work, and ours. Here is the one writer we always want to read on California showing us the startling contradictions in its–and in America’s–core values. Joan didion’s unerring sense of america and its spirit, her acute interpretation of its institutions and literature, and her incisive questioning of the stories it tells itself make this fiercely intelligent book a provocative and important tour de force from one of our greatest writers.

Where i was from, in didion’s words, confusions as much about america as about California, “represents an exploration into my own confusions about the place and the way in which I grew up, misapprehensions and misunderstandings so much a part of who I became that I can still to this day confront them only obliquely.

The book is a haunting narrative of how her own family moved west with the frontier from the birth of her great-great-great-great-great-grandmother in Virginia in 1766 to the death of her mother on the edge of the Pacific in 2001; of how the wagon-train stories of hardship and abandonment and endurance created a culture in which survival would seem the sole virtue.

Where I Was From Vintage International #ad - In where i was from, to examine how the folly and recklessness in the very grain of the california settlement led to the california we know today–a state mortgaged first to the railroad, as well as that of such California writers as Frank Norris and Jack London and Henry George, then to the aerospace industry, and overwhelmingly to the federal government, Didion turns what John Leonard has called “her sonar ear, her radar eye” onto her own work, a dependent colony of those political and corporate owners who fly in for the annual encampment of the Bohemian Club.

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Ecology of Fear: Los Angeles And The Imagination Of Disaster

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Metropolitan Books #ad - Rich with detail, bold and original, Ecology of Fear is a gripping reconnaissance into the urban future, an essential portrait of America at the millennium. The former "land of sunshine" is now seen by much of the world, including many of L. A. S increasingly nervous residents, as a veritable Book of the Apocalypse theme park.

Middle-class apprehensions about angry underclasses are exceeded only by anxieties about blind thrust faults underlying downtown L. A. Los angeles has become a magnet for the American apocalyptic imagination. Or about the firestorms that periodically incinerate Malibu. In this extraordinary book, unravels the secret political history of disaster, real and imaginary, the author of City of Quartz and our most fascinating interpreter of the American metropolis, Mike Davis, in Southern California.

Ecology of Fear: Los Angeles And The Imagination Of Disaster #ad - And he shows that the floods, fires, and earthquakes reaped by the city were tragedies as avoidable--and unnatural--as the beating of Rodney King and the ensuing explosion in the streets. And the force of real catastrophe has been redoubled by the obsessive fictional destruction of Los Angeles--by aliens, comets, and twisters--in scores of novels and films.

Riot, fire, flood, earthquake.

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The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit - Updated Edition Princeton Classics Book 105

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Princeton University Press #ad - In this reappraisal of america’s racial and economic inequalities, Thomas Sugrue asks why Detroit and other industrial cities have become the sites of persistent racialized poverty. He challenges the conventional wisdom that urban decline is the product of the social programs and racial fissures of the 1960s.

. Weaving together the history of workplaces, discrimination, and real estate agencies, civil rights groups, political organizations, unions, Sugrue finds the roots of today’s urban poverty in a hidden history of racial violence, and deindustrialization that reshaped the American urban landscape after World War II.

The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit - Updated Edition Princeton Classics Book 105 #ad - This princeton classics edition includes a new preface by Sugrue, discussing the lasting impact of the postwar transformation on urban America and the chronic issues leading to Detroit’s bankruptcy. Once america's "arsenal of democracy, " Detroit is now the symbol of the American urban crisis.

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White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism Politics and Society in Modern America Book 89

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Princeton University Press #ad - Likewise, white resistance gave birth to several new conservative causes, tuition vouchers, like the tax revolt, and privatization of public services. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: "The City Too Busy Moving to Hate.

In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of "white flight" in Atlanta and elsewhere. Tracing the journey of southern conservatives from white supremacy to white suburbia, Kruse locates the origins of modern American politics. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism Politics and Society in Modern America Book 89 #ad - During the civil rights era, atlanta thought of itself as "The City Too Busy to Hate, " a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms, White Flight moves past simple stereotypes to explore the meaning of white resistance. In a provocative revision of postwar american history, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, Kruse demonstrates that traditional elements of modern conservatism, underwent important transformations during the postwar struggle over segregation.

In the end, which failed to stop the civil rights movement, Kruse finds that segregationist resistance, nevertheless managed to preserve the world of segregation and even perfect it in subtler and stronger forms. Challenging the conventional wisdom that white flight meant nothing more than a literal movement of whites to the suburbs, this book argues that it represented a more important transformation in the political ideology of those involved.

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Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States

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Oxford University Press #ad - And Europe. In conclusion, jackson offers a controversial prediction: that the future of residential deconcentration will be very different from its past in both the U. S. He treats communities in every section of the U. S. And compares american residential patterns with those of Japan and Europe. Integrating social history with economic and architectural analysis, and rapid transportation, inexpensive building methods, and taking into account such factors as the availability of cheap land, Kenneth Jackson chronicles the phenomenal growth of the American suburb from the middle of the 19th century to the present day.

This first full-scale history of the development of the American suburb examines how "the good life" in America came to be equated with the a home of one's own surrounded by a grassy yard and located far from the urban workplace.

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No There There: Race, Class, and Political Community in Oakland

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University of California Press #ad - Taking oakland as a case study of urban politics and society in the United States, Chris Rhomberg examines the city's successive episodes of popular insurgency for what they can tell us about critical discontinuities in the American experience of urban political community. Challenged by ku klux klan action in the '20s, california, and the rise of the civil rights and black power struggles of the '60s, labor protests culminating in a general strike in the '40s, Oakland, seems to encapsulate in one city the broad and varied sweep of urban social movements in twentieth-century America.

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Living for the City: Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - In the early 1960s, attending merritt college and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers' rank and file. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics.

. By excavating this hidden history, living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy. During an era of expansion and political struggle in California's system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP.

Living for the City: Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture #ad - In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party BPP started with a study group. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay's African American community--young, poor, and migrant--challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership.

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Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right - Updated Edition Politics and Society in Modern America Book 115

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Princeton University Press #ad - Suburban warriors introduces us to these people: women hosting coffee klatches for Barry Goldwater in their tract houses; members of anticommunist reading groups organizing against sex education; pro-life Democrats gradually drawn into conservative circles; and new arrivals finding work in defense companies and a sense of community in Orange County's mushrooming evangelical churches.

We learn what motivated them and how they interpreted their political activity. Her original contribution to the social history of politics broadens—and often upsets—our understanding of the deep and tenacious roots of popular conservatism in America. Mainstream america snickered at warnings by California Congressman James B.

Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right - Updated Edition Politics and Society in Modern America Book 115 #ad - Lisa mcgirr shows that their movement was not one of marginal people suffering from status anxiety, but rather one formed by successful entrepreneurial types with modern lifestyles and bright futures. While introducing these rank-and-file activists, McGirr chronicles Orange County's rise from "nut country" to political vanguard.

Yet, in utt's home district of orange county, thousands of middle-class suburbanites proceeded to organize a powerful conservative movement that would land Ronald Reagan in the White House and redefine the spectrum of acceptable politics into the next century. She describes how these suburban pioneers created new political and social philosophies anchored in a fusion of Christian fundamentalism, xenophobic nationalism, and western libertarianism.

. Through this history, she traces the evolution of the New Right from a virulent anticommunist, anti-establishment fringe to a broad national movement nourished by evangelical Protestantism.

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Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Jackson, Boston Globe. No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, environmental, and business history can be as graceful, powerful, urban, and fascinating as a novel. Kenneth T. A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize.

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Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940

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Basic Books #ad - The award-winning, where gay men were isolated, invisible, field-defining history of gay life in New York City in the early to mid-20th centuryGay New York brilliantly shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet, and self-hating. Called "monumental" washington post, gay new yorkforever changed how we think about the history of gay life in New York City, "brilliant" The Nation, and "a first-rate book of history" The New York Times, "unassailable" Boston Globe, and beyond.

. Drawing on a rich trove of diaries, george Chauncey constructs a fascinating portrait of a vibrant, legal records, and other unpublished documents, cohesive gay world that is not supposed to have existed.

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