Seduction and Betrayal: Women and Literature New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - The novelist and essayist elizabeth hardwick is one of contemporary America’s most brilliant writers, in which she considers the careers of women writers as well as the larger question of the presence of women in literature, and Seduction and Betrayal, is her most passionate and concentrated work of criticism.

A gallery of unforgettable portraits—of virginia woolf and zelda fitzgerald, and the poems of Sylvia Plath, Dorothy Wordsworth and Jane Carlyle—as well as a provocative reading of such works as Wuthering Heights, women and writing, Hedda Gabler,  Seduction and Betrayal is a virtuoso performance, a major writer’s reckoning with the relations between men and women, writing and life.

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Sleepless Nights New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - An inspired fusion of fact and invention, hard-bitten, this beautifully realized, lyrical book is not only Elizabeth Hardwick’s finest fiction but one of the outstanding contributions to American literature of the last fifty years. In sleepless nights a woman looks back on her life—the parade of people, portraits, the shifting background of place—and assembles a scrapbook of memories, reflections, wishes, letters, and dreams.

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The Collected Essays of Elizabeth Hardwick New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - Selected and with an introduction by darryl pinckney, the Collected Essays gathers more than fifty essays for a fifty-year retrospective of Hardwick’s work from 1953 to 2003. She contemplates writers’ lives—women writers, letters, rebels, Americans abroad—and the literary afterlife of biographies, and diaries.

For hardwick, ” writes pinckney, “the poetry and novels of America hold the nation’s history. Here is an exhilarating chronicle of that history. In the essays collected here she covers civil rights demonstrations in the 1960s, James, describes places where she lived and locations she visited, Wharton—and the changes in American fiction, and writes about the foundations of American literature—Melville, though her reading is wide and international.

The Collected Essays of Elizabeth Hardwick New York Review Books Classics #ad - The first-ever collection of essays from across Elizabeth Hardwick's illustrious writing career, including works not seen in print for decades. Elizabeth hardwick wrote during the golden age of the American literary essay. For hardwick, the essay was an imaginative endeavor, a serious form, criticism worthy of the literature in question.

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The New York Stories of Elizabeth Hardwick New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - Elizabeth hardwick was one of America’s great postwar women of letters, celebrated as a novelist and as an essayist. Individual lives and the life of new York, the setting or backdrop for most of these stories, are strikingly and memorably depicted in Hardwick’s beautiful and razor-sharp prose. This first collection of Hardwick’s short fiction reveals her brilliance as a stylist and as an observer of contemporary life.

. A young woman returns from New York to her childhood Kentucky home and discovers the world of difference within her. Until now, her slim but remarkable achievement as a writer of short stories has remained largely hidden, however,  The New Yorker, with her work tucked away in the pages of the periodicals—such asPartisan Review, and The New York Review of Books—in which it originally appeared.

The New York Stories of Elizabeth Hardwick New York Review Books Classics #ad - A girl’s boyfriend is not quite good enough, light and cool, revealing nothing except pure possibility, his “silvery eyes, like a coin in hand. A magazine editor’s life falls strangely to pieces after she loses both her husband and her job.

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The Dolphin Letters, 1970-1979: Elizabeth Hardwick, Robert Lowell, and Their Circle

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - The correspondence between one of the most famous couples of twentieth-century literatureThe Dolphin Letters offers an unprecedented portrait of Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Hardwick during the last seven years of Lowell’s life 1970 to 1977, a time of personal crisis and creative innovation for both writers.

. Lowell and hardwick are acutely intelligent observers of marriages, and friends, children, and of the feelings that their personal crises gave rise to. The dolphin letters, masterfully edited by saskia hamilton, is a debate about the limits of art—what occasions a work of art, what moral and artistic license artists have to make use of their lives as material, what formal innovations such debates give rise to.

The Dolphin Letters, 1970-1979: Elizabeth Hardwick, Robert Lowell, and Their Circle #ad - Centered on the letters they exchanged with each other and with other members of their circle—writers, Caroline Blackwood, intellectuals, and publishers, friends, including Elizabeth Bishop, and Adrienne Rich—the book has the narrative sweep of a novel, telling the story of the dramatic breakup of their twenty-one-year marriage and their extraordinary, Mary McCarthy, but late, reconciliation.

Lowell’s controversial sonnet-sequence the dolphin for which he used hardwick’s letters as a source and his last book, Day by Day, were written during this period, as were Hardwick’s influential books Seduction and Betrayal: Essays on Women in Literature and Sleepless Nights: A Novel. The crisis of lowell’s the dolphin was profoundly affecting to everyone surrounding him, and Bishop’s warning to Lowell—“art just isn’t worth that much”—haunts.

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Genius and Ink: Virginia Woolf on How to Read

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TLS Books #ad - Eliot, henry James and E. Foreword by ali smithwith an introduction by francesca wadewho better to serve as a guide to great books and their authors than Virginia Woolf?In the early years of its existence, the Times Literary Supplement published some of the finest writers in English: T. Above all, here is virginia Woolf the reader, whose enthusiasm for great literature remains palpable and inspirational today.

S. M. But one of the paper’s defining voices was Virginia Woolf, who produced a string of superb essays between the two World Wars. The weirdness of elizabethan plays, the supreme examples of charlotte brontë, in anonymously published pieces, the pleasure of revisiting favourite novels, George Eliot and Henry James, Thomas Hardy and Joseph Conrad: all are here, in which may be glimpsed the thinking behind Woolf’s works of fiction and the enquiring, feminist spirit of A Room of One’s Own.

Genius and Ink: Virginia Woolf on How to Read #ad - Here is woolf the critical essayist, a playful hypothesis and, at one moment, offering, at another, a judgement laid down with the authority of a twentieth-century Dr Johnson. Forster among them. Here is woolf working out precisely what’s great about Hardy, and how Elizabeth Barrett Browning made books a “substitute for living” because she was “forbidden to scamper on the grass”.

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Square Haunting: Five Writers in London Between the Wars

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Tim Duggan Books #ad - A beautiful and deeply moving book. Sally rooney, author of normal peoplean engrossing group portrait of five women writers, including Virginia Woolf, who moved to London’s Mecklenburgh Square in search of new freedom in their lives and work. D. Detective novelist Dorothy L. On the outskirts of bloomsbury known for the eponymous group who “lived in squares, painted in circles, ” the square was home to students, and loved in triangles, struggling artists, and revolutionaries.

I like this London life. In an era when women’s freedoms were fast expanding, they each sought a space where they could live, love, and—above all—work independently. Sayers, classicist jane Harrison, economic historian Eileen Power, and author and publisher Virginia Woolf. With sparkling insight and a novelistic style, Francesca Wade sheds new light on a group of artists and thinkers whose pioneering work would enrich the possibilities of women’s lives for generations to come.

Square Haunting: Five Writers in London Between the Wars #ad - In the pivotal era between the two world wars, the lives of five remarkable women intertwined at this one address: modernist poet H. The street-sauntering and square-haunting. Virginia woolf, diary, 1925 in the early twentieth century, Mecklenburgh Square—a hidden architectural gem in the heart of London—was a radical address.

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Essays One

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - A selection of essays on writing and reading by the master short-fiction writer Lydia DavisLydia Davis is a writer whose originality, influence, and wit are beyond compare. In this first of two volumes, from john ashbery’s translation of Rimbaud to Alan Cote’s painting, her subjects range from her earliest influences to her favorite short stories, and from the Shepherd’s Psalm to early tourist photographs.

Jonathan franzen has called her “a magician of self-consciousness, ” while Rick Moody hails her as "the best prose stylist in America. And for claire messud, “Davis's signal gift is to make us feel alive. Best known for her masterful short stories and translations, Davis’s gifts extend equally to her nonfiction.

Essays One #ad - In essays one, gathered a selection of essays, commentaries, for the first time, Davis has, and lectures composed over the past five decades. On display is the development and range of one of the sharpest, most capacious minds writing today.

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The Dolphin: Two Versions, 1972-1973

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - This new edition, which follows the 1973 edition, includes scans of the pages of Lowell’s original manuscript, giving us a look into the brilliant and complicated mind of one of our most beloved and distinguished poets. This book, half fiction, an eelnet made by man for the eel fightingmy eyes have seen what my hand did.

Winner of the 1974 pulitzer prize in poetry, the celebrated writer and critic Elizabeth Hardwick, The Dolphin was controversial from the beginning: many of the poems include the letters that Robert Lowell’s wife, wrote to him after he left her for the English socialite and writer Caroline Blackwood.

The Dolphin: Two Versions, 1972-1973 #ad - . I have sat and listened to too manywords of the collaborating muse, and plotted perhaps too freely with my life, not avoiding injury to others, not avoiding injury to myself—to ask compassion . He was warned by many, among them Elizabeth Bishop, that “art just isn’t worth that much. Nevertheless, these poems are a powerful document of an impulsive love, and a moving record of Lowell’s change from one life and marriage in America to a new life on new terms with a new family in England, rendered with the stunning technical power and control for which he was so celebrated.

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Parisian Lives: Samuel Beckett, Simone de Beauvoir, and Me: A Memoir

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Nan A. Talese #ad - Her seven-year relationship with the forceful and difficult Beauvoir required a radical change in approach and yielded another groundbreaking literary profile while also awakening Bair to an era of burgeoning feminist consciousness. Drawing on bair's extensive notes from the period, including never-before-told anecdotes and details considered impossible to publish at the time, Parisian Lives gives us an entirely new perspective on the all-too-human side of these legendary thinkers.

A publishers weekly best book of the yearnational book award-winning biographer Deirdre Bair explores her fifteen remarkable years in Paris with Samuel Beckett and Simone de Beauvoir, painting intimate new portraits of two literary giants and revealing secrets of the biographical art. In 1971 deirdre bair was a journalist and a recently minted Ph.

Parisian Lives: Samuel Beckett, Simone de Beauvoir, and Me: A Memoir #ad - D. Where beckett had been retiring and elusive, Beauvoir was domineering and all encompassing. The next seven years of probing conversations, intercontinental research, and peculiar cat-and-mouse games resulted in Samuel Beckett: A Biography, singular encounters with Beckett's friends, which went on to win the National Book Award and propel Bair to her next subject: Simone de Beauvoir.

Bair, who resorted to dodging one subject or the other by hiding out in the great cafés of Paris, learned that what works in terms of process for one biography rarely applies to the next. Who managed to secure access to Nobel Prize-winning author Samuel Beckett. He agreed that she could be his biographer despite her never having written a biography before.

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